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Change Management

Each day brings new stories of a changing economy that has left workers behind. Today’s graduates will emerge into a world that is fundamentally different from the one their parents and grandparents entered. Students’ ability to navigate this new world depends on their deep mastery of a broader set of knowledge and skills – and the ability of schools to support them.

Most students today are educated within a 19th century school model. Not only is this model not designed to address the challenges of the future, it’s also not set up to make sure all students achieve today. Dedicated leaders and educators across the country are working to solve this problem by undertaking myriad changes – large and small – to ensure that all students have an opportunity to succeed.

In 2012, San Jose Unified School District piloted a redesign competition to spur and support new school models. With support from The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and a donor-advised grant from the Silicon Valley Community Foundation and in partnership with the Institute for the Future and Enterprise Development Group, then-Superintendent Vincent Matthews challenged school leaders and educators to develop and propose new ideas for reforming schools. Selected proposals received extra resources as well as coaching and implementation support from Cross & Joftus to put their new ideas into place.

Working with San Jose redesign teams reminded us that, at its core, school redesign and improvement is an exercise in change, and changing how we educate a
nd support our students is an incredibly complex task. With Hewlett’s support, C&J set out to distill what we know about change management theory and practice into a clear and comprehensive resource for leaders undertaking reforms in schools and communities across the country.

The Playbook for Redesigning Schools for the 21st Century offers practical guidance on how to initiate, plan, implement, and manage a school redesign process, guiding readers through the process of developing a clear and coherent vision for change and then designing and managing the change process.It also provides tools and resources for creating a positive school culture and developing the key skills, knowledge, and dispositions necessary to support a highly effective redesign effort. Its use isn’t limited to full-scale redesign. Schools and districts seeking to initiate and manage changes of all types and sizes can use the Playbook’s tools.

“The Playbook is a thorough and practical guide for district and school leaders undertaking improvement efforts. Change is hard; having a clear process – and tools and resources like the Playbook – makes it easier and more likely to take hold.”

-Mark Bielang, Superintendent, Portage (MI) Public Schools

Given the pressing need to prepare students for a future world, and the pace of change in today’s, it’s likely that schools and districts will need to get used to change – and will need support to do it well. We hope this resource proves useful.

The Playbook is an open resource available to download here as a free, print-ready book.

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Author(s): Amy Cox and Jean-Claude Brizard

The Keys to Achieving Success in School and District Transformation, Part 1

What does it really take to turn around a struggling school or school district?

More than 15 years ago, Michael Fullan wrote in Phi Delta Kappan that “the main reason for the failure of these reforms to go to scale and to endure is that we have failed to understand that both local school development and the quality of the surrounding infrastructure are critical for lasting success.” In his The Three Stories of School Reform, Fullan contends that the most significant enemies of large-scale reform are overload and extreme fragmentation. He argues for coherence and maintains that the work of reform must occur both inside and outside the system—from the schoolhouse to the state house.

As a former school superintendent, I have always found it puzzling that so many push for school-level reforms without a parallel focus on the central office, state department of education and surrounding community. It’s no surprise that under these circumstances the money and effort allocated to reform have not yielded satisfactory results. A look at the schools under review in any state or district shows a repeated cycle of failure and a depressing trail of dollars spent.

The work of transformation is neither simple nor easy. It is no small task to educate ALL of the children in our nation’s schools. While we have experienced successes, our children still have unequal access to quality education across communities. Why? Because partial reforms have led to partial progress.

The good news is that a number of states and districts are implementing or considering a much more cogent strategy of school improvement. Say Yes to Education (SYTE), for example, posits that we are often focusing on the wrong levers and has demonstrated that the city or county is the unit of change. SYTE leverages a complex network of schools, higher education, governmental systems, service providers, and community organizations to create a comprehensive strategy—with a unique data approach—to improve student educational outcomes and post-secondary success. Through our work advising SYTE and providing strategic support to its districts, we have been fortunate to witness firsthand the success of this approach.

At the state level, Massachusetts has a bold and well-thought-out plan for district and school turnaround. In 2014, the Massachusetts Department of Education commissioned the Institute for Strategic Leadership and Learning to conduct a three-year analysis of school and district practices, systems, and policies and use of resources contributing to successful turnaround efforts. The levers identified reinforce the argument that the effort must be comprehensive and coherent. They include:

  • Employing strategic human capital;
  • Getting the right leaders and teachers in place;
  • Organizing the district for successful turnaround;
  • Organizing district offices, policies, and resources to support, monitor, and expand turnaround efforts;
  • Targeting resources on instruction and professional practice; and
  • Understanding how districts and schools used funding to drive turnaround efforts.

 
Though specific approaches vary, no matter how it is sliced, reforms, strategies and initiatives must be integrated into a system-wide improvement strategy to avoid the Frankenstein’s Monster syndrome—parts may look ok but the whole is incoherent, producing inconsistent results. School transformation doesn’t occur in a vacuum. Engaging a broad array of partners in the work is essential to ensuring the success of any school or district transformation effort.

Opportunity in ESSA
With the latest iteration of ESEA, state and local education agencies will see significant autonomy and decision-making authority returned to them. School Improvement Grants in their current form are ended and states are being given the power to redefine school success. This provides a tremendous new opportunity for a coherent, systemic approach to reform and lift many systems and schools out of their current underperformance.

This post is the first in a three-part series examining the key components of successful school and district transformation.

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Author(s): Jean-Claude Brizard

At what point does an effort to scale an effective education practice turn into a mandate?

This question, I believe, strikes at the heart of education reform and suggests the cause of disappointing results for promising federal initiatives such as Race to the Top and School Improvement Grants.

The driving force behind every education reform initiative, from the national level to the local level, is ultimately to improve outcomes for students. It is a goal passionately shared by educators, administrators, and policymakers alike as they seek to identify effective education practices and implement them broadly. Yet, time and again, I have seen local efforts to bring effective practice to scale falter when an initiative is mandated rather than developed with the involvement of educators. In places as diverse as rural Kansas and Washington, DC, I have witnessed waning interest in promising education reform practices once a practice became a district, state, or federal requirement.

For example, in one urban district with which I work, principals were required for the first time this year to conduct regular, non-evaluative classroom observations and either provide “coaching notes” to the teacher or meet with the teacher to discuss what they saw and how instruction could be improved.  At that time, these observations were not performed for the purpose of evaluating the teacher, and some principals in the district had already been successfully conducting observations and coaching teachers to improve instructional practice in years past.

A needs assessment of the district, conducted by my organization, determined that teachers’ use of effective instructional practices was sporadic at best and was likely contributing to unacceptably low student achievement.  In an effort to improve instruction, the district began requiring principals—with training and the support of their supervisors (a newly created position)—to use a common observation template and process, observe at least 20 classrooms per month, and participate in a quarterly meeting in which results were reviewed and discussed.

The shift from sporadically used practice to required process certainly increased implementation, but it created another problem: According to a review that I recently conducted, principals and teachers alike view the district-mandated classroom observations merely as a compliance exercise and not as an opportunity to improve instructional practice.  And while the observation and follow-up coaching processes certainly have room for improvement, I believe that the main reason for educators’ dissatisfaction is that the observations and coaching—unquestionably a great idea when done well—are now viewed as something they must do rather than as a practice that will improve teachers’ performance and ultimately increase student achievement.

Agency has been lost as boxes must be checked: Educators’ motivation has shifted from the internal (how can we improve instructional practice) to external (how do I meet the requirement that the district has imposed upon me).

None of this should come as a surprise anyone.  Beginning in the late 1980s and early 1990s with the great tide of education implementation research, Milbrey McLaughlin and others found that “policymakers can’t mandate what matters.”  Much more recently (February 2015), David Berliner and Gene Glass noted that “school reforms that work in some places don’t work in others” and concluded that it is “no wonder we can’t find a silver bullet for school programs.”

So what’s the answer? First, we cannot mandate behaviors and expect that they are going to be followed in the way we intend or with the outcomes we desire. Second, general guidelines or principles—especially when emanating from the federal and even state levels—are much preferred to specific policies or rules. For the federal and state levels, setting goals, disseminating information, providing high-quality support, and requiring protection of civil rights and improvement of student learning are helpful; requiring fidelity to a set of specific practices (even if they were found to be effective in other schools or districts) is not.

I firmly believe that the vast majority of educators and administrators are trying hard to improve outcomes for students, even when motivated by complying with policies from “above.”  But I also believe that these same educators and administrators will move mountains when they are motivated by their understanding of practices that work and have the ability to shape those practices in a way that makes sense for them.  It’s a tough balance to strike, but it’s the only one that matters.

Learn more about our School, District, and State System Improvement work.

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Author(s): Scott Joftus