Systems, Still Not Superheroes

The question remains: can one person, the Superhero Superintendent, save a struggling, broken school district or is she a mere mortal, destined to be defeated by a lack of systemic coherence?

Back in 2008, I partnered with Susan Tave Zelman, former Ohio Superintendent of Public Instruction and current Executive Director of the Ohio Department of Education, to write an article for the AASA Journal of Scholarship and Practice titled Systems, Not Superheroes about the need for districts and states to stop putting all of their eggs in the basket of superhero leaders and start investing in “complete and interlocking systems to support reform.”  Six years later, it seems that little has changed as demonstrated most recently by the Los Angeles Unified MiSiS record-keeping system problems and the subsequent leadership upheaval.

Nabbing high-profile executives is not a comprehensive school reform strategy, especially given how long most of those individuals stay in the job.  A recent survey conducted by the Council of the Great City Schools found that the average tenure of urban school superintendents dropped to 3.2 years in the 2013-2014 school year, a decline after 10 years of modest growth.

As Dr. Zelman and I wrote in 2008, even the most qualified individual would have a difficult time leading when faced with disconnected curricula and assessments; nonexistent resource tracking systems; disconnected teacher and principal recruitment, evaluation, and retention systems; and a demoralized, unsupported constituency of students and educators.  As depicted in the following graphic, an integrated system must be developed in which human, fiscal, and community resources coupled with accountability support and extend the instructional system to improve student learning and achievement.

Superheroes Blog Graphic

Figure 1: Complex, interrelated organization with subsystems (Ohio Department of Education)

When we create such a system,

  • Teachers and school leaders have the knowledge, skills, and professional development they need to help all schools learn;
  • Funding is aligned to a plan, based on data, focused on clear goals, and provides effective support for educators;
  • Parents and families, business and industry, local community organizations, state and local health and human service agencies, and the media are actively engaged in the effort to improve school efficacy and student achievement;
  • Performance targets regarding knowledge, skills, and abilities are set for students and educators that are fair, attainable, but also a stretch; and
  • Instruction is based upon clear expectations of what we want our students to know and be able to do and is implemented by educators with the capacity to teach well thanks to aligned community, human, and fiscal resources.

A coherent, interdependent, sustainable system such as this allows the district leader to abandon the failure-bound role of Superhero and embrace the far more valuable role of Instructional Leader. The district leader will then have the freedom to do something truly heroic, that of helping educators teach students in the most effective way possible so that they can achieve their true potential.  Because while strong and charismatic leaders are essential, systems and extraordinary leaders need to live in harmony.

Now that is the happy ending we all wish to see.

 

Thanks to Torrey Shawe for her contributions to this post.

Christopher Cross_outside
Author(s): Christopher T. Cross
Tags: District and State System Improvement, Education, Education Policy, Leadership Development, Politics
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